GloboChrist: The Great Commission Takes a Postmodern Turn

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Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Nov 30, Mark rated it really liked it. A provocative and no holds barred engagement with contemporary missiology and its challenges. The key is eschatology. And unless we have a robust eschatology that is full both of the convictions AND humility of the kingdom, we will have nothing to say or do in t A provocative and no holds barred engagement with contemporary missiology and its challenges.

And unless we have a robust eschatology that is full both of the convictions AND humility of the kingdom, we will have nothing to say or do in the face of Islamist eschatologies or the power games of Nietzschean geo-politics.

GloboChrist: The Great Commission Takes a Postmodern Turn The Church and Postmodern Culture

Raschke is excellent at showing why liberal theology, together with its contemporary legacy of aspects of emergent church culture, is helpless and useless at engaging with this situation. But modernist fundamentalism and aspects of evangelical Protestantism aren't necessarily much better. Some may get lost in the intricacies of postmodern thought, so this is not the book with which to start investigating these phenomena.

Raschke assumes at least some familiarity with the territory, although he explains things with clarity. What I particularly appreciated was his insights into Islamism and its seeds in writers like Qutb Sayed and his very influential Milestones. Even if he is not on the right lines here I'm not expert enough to judge fully , he makes a very helpful contribution to our understanding of the situation.

Carl Raschke: GloboChrist : The Pneuma Review

Post-Brexit, post-Drumpf, this book seems to have even more relevance as the world appears to become increasingly fragmented. The need for a plausible, humble, servant-hearted community of conviction and Christlikeness has never gone away - but the unpredictable new world into which we seem to be hurtling makes this more urgent than ever. Jun 18, Dwight Davis rated it really liked it.

A really helpful book on missions in the postmodern moment. Raschke offers us a good way forward in the midst of globalization and Islamism. Rashcke has some great thoughts here about the importance of contextualization Incarnational ministry. Although I don't necessarily agree with everything he posits, this is a really helpful read.

Jun 16, Bryan rated it it was amazing. Possibly the best book I've read yet on the present relationship of the church to the world.


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Also it is full of surprises as Raschke seems to evade theological predictability. In fact he seems to disagree at least partly, and sometimes to large extent, with practically everyone - except perhaps Bonhoeffer and Jesus, which of course puts him in good company.

This is one of those books that makes one have to grapple with the issues raised. I recall this was what also happened the first time I read Possibly the best book I've read yet on the present relationship of the church to the world. At any rate, definitely worth the read, and also there is never a dull moment. Apr 30, David rated it it was amazing Shelves: global-christianity , christianity-and-culture , theology.

This is an absolute must-read for Christian leaders in America. Raschke has given us a gem here in which we find critiques of both the "conservative right" and "liberal left" of Western Christianity with the challenge to view the world and the church through global eyes.

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Globalization is happening and the Church is exploding through the world. Raschke helps us understand this and how it changes how we must do ministry. The first chapter focuses on how Christianity has become not merely a Western This is an absolute must-read for Christian leaders in America. The first chapter focuses on how Christianity has become not merely a Western religion as if it was ever meant to be but a global one. Here he argues that the whole debate about the "emerging" church in America is much less radical or important when compared to the explosion of Christianity in the global south.

He spends the second chapter talking about incarnational ministry, contextualizing the gospel, and what it means to be truly relevant. Chapter three carries on many of these same themes with a good bit of philosophy and bible in there too. It is the latter half of the book that really scores a home run. The fourth chapter examines the challenge of Islam.

GloboChrist: The Great Commission Takes A Postmodern Turn. By Carl Raschke.

Raschke argues that Western secularism will fail in its encounter with Islam since it does not understand Islam. But beyond that, the Western evangelical church has made a "fateful alliance" with our culture which has led to a spiritual weakness. This weakness has left the church ill-equipped in its conflict with Islam. Raschke pulls no punches here and his words may strike some as intolerant but he is absolutely right in saying that whatever similarities there are between Islam and Christianity, the differences will always be greater p.

In other words, Christians and Muslims are followers of different faiths and there is no way to, as some seem to want to, make the faiths the same. Chapter five than focuses on radical relationality and reinventing global evangelism.

The Great Commission Takes a Postmodern Turn

Here Raschke writes, "The kind of radical, relational and incarnational Christian witness that a postmodernized Great Commission entails would have the ferocity of jihad and paradoxically also the love for the lost that Jesus demonstrated. Unfortunately the postmodern West has been deeply afflicted by a passivity and a privatized sentimentality that makes the passion of commitment to God's dramatic future virtually impossible" Chapter six speaks of eschatology "end times" and how globalization is leading to the clashing of two different eschatologies: Christian and Islam.

Raschke gives us more great stuff here, especially this: "The Christian West - in its privatized middle-class cocoon of consumerist self-indulgence, fortified with all the politically correct opinions, and indulging in what the Dutch, borrowing from the French, call being satisfait - has assumed that eschatology is no longer relevant. After all, why do we need a new heaven and a new earth when people who have historically hated one another can now learn to love one another through podcasting? But eschatology is increasingly relevant to Raschke asks if we will have the courage to preach the GloboChrist, the Lord and Savior of the world, or if we will sit around and complain about the religious right and megachurches.

The final chapter is almost a sidenote about the debates over "postmodern" in much of evangelical Christianity. Raschke writes, and certainly causes a chuckle, that "railing against postmodernism and exhorting contemporary Christians to eschew it is not much different than urging them to go out of their way to avoid the permanent legacy" In other words, "postmodern" is the world we live in after, i. He critiques some traditional fundamentalist evangelicals such as John Macarthur.

But he also takes shots at "progressive" evangelicals such as Brian McLaren. Those who have argued that Jesus is not a religious right Republican have fallen into the danger of making Jesus appear to be a Democrat instead; Jesus is neither. Being legalistic, too exclusive and narrow-minded is idolatry, but so too is being too open-minded and radically inclusive. Again, I highly recommend this book! It will challenge you to enhance your view of the world and of the Church while moving you to serve Jesus Christ in your own context.

Nov 30, Tim rated it really liked it. A thoughtful book that sees globalization which he hastily equates with postmodernism and the indigenization of the gospel as the necessary components of a modern missional faith.

He compares Christianity with activist Islam to provoke the church to proper action in the world. Raschke's thinking is challenging even if it seems to rely on a fairly narrow range of thinkers on non-theological topics and his writing style is sharp, not shy to point out the faults of conservative evangelicals an A thoughtful book that sees globalization which he hastily equates with postmodernism and the indigenization of the gospel as the necessary components of a modern missional faith. Raschke's thinking is challenging even if it seems to rely on a fairly narrow range of thinkers on non-theological topics and his writing style is sharp, not shy to point out the faults of conservative evangelicals and the emerging church alike.

To quote him on modern religious life, "Today's eclectic spiritualism, even in its Christian variations, is simpler a cockier and more self-important subset of global consumption, which promises anything anytime to anyone so long as it is enjoyable, satisfying, and undemanding. Jan 27, Greg Kerestan rated it liked it. I don't read much sociology or theology, but as part of a course I took on liberation philosophy and theology in the Third World, I picked up this work on the more radical, socialist-leaning branch of liberation theology in the Catholic Church.

In this time of renewed interest in democratic socialism and the rise of Bernie Sanders's popularity as a viable presidential candidate, whatever side one is on, it's interesting to see that these ideas of antimaterialism and charity are still viable with I don't read much sociology or theology, but as part of a course I took on liberation philosophy and theology in the Third World, I picked up this work on the more radical, socialist-leaning branch of liberation theology in the Catholic Church.

In this time of renewed interest in democratic socialism and the rise of Bernie Sanders's popularity as a viable presidential candidate, whatever side one is on, it's interesting to see that these ideas of antimaterialism and charity are still viable within a religious system often stereotyped as greedy and self-serving.

North America is today in the same situation as the environment in which the early Celtic preachers found their mission fields: unfamiliar with the Christian message, yet spiritually seeking and open to a vibrant new faith. If we are to spread the gospel in this culture of secular seekers, we would do well to learn from the Celtic Christians. Coleman more Instead of drawing on the latest popular fad or the newest selling technique, Robert E.

Coleman looks to the Bible to find the answer to the question, What was Christ's strategy for evangelism? Through a thorough examination of the gospel accounts, Coleman points out unchanging, simple, yet profound biblical principles of how to emulate Christ to others. Additional Books from the Course Bibliography. Joe Aldrich. Oswald Sanders. Sources for Articles on Subjects Above.